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Michael Buser 24 months ago
ActivityRank: 48
I'm collecting info about sites involved with managed retreat from the coast - particularly the relocation of homes and infrastructure due to coastal erosion, sea level rise, etc. 

Currently, I'm just hoping to develop a list - There are a few I know about
Fairbourne Wales (contesting it)
Shishmaref, Alaska (and a few other Native Alaskan communities) 
Pacific Islands (e.g. Fiji; Solomon Islands)
Mississippi Delta (Isle de Jen Charles)
Staten Island New York (state bought a few homes along the coast after Hurricane Sandy)

I've heard about most of these from newspaper articles - i wonder if there is a better way to find these?

thanks for any thoughts...or locations. 

Michael 
Antony Lyons 23 months ago
ActivityRank: 138
Antony Lyons 23 months ago
ActivityRank: 138
Antony Lyons 23 months ago
ActivityRank: 138
https://www.theguardian.com/world/2017/jan/18/canada-island-climate-change-sea-level-rise-lennox

...but here are some excerpts from the comments section:


"Lennox Island is indeed eroding and its low-lying areas are subject to coastal flooding under present-day conditions. Relative sea level rise in this area has been about 32cm over the past 100 years. If this rate accelerates (as predicted by global warming effects), the potential for increased erosion and flooding does indeed worsen. Erosion on the island has, however, been overstated in several recent news reports. Our recent analysis of the island indicates that erosion rates are generally equivalent to those seen throughout Prince Edward Island. Concerns are valid, but recent media coverage (Globe & Mail, CBC, National Geographic, and the present Guardian article) all use a combination of hyperbole, extreme statistics and, in some cases, completely erroneous analysis to create a dystopian picture. 
Between 1845 (Bayfield's remarkable survey of PEI) and 2010, Lennox Island has gone from 550 hectares down to roughly 500 ha. (A loss of 50 ha, not 300+ as reported here). This is a loss rate of 0.3 ha/yr. Using more accurate recent data, the Island's erosion rate 1968-2010 is about 0.2 ha/yr. 
Valid concerns about erosion and flooding hazards and the effects of climate change are being clouded and distorted by errors in interpretation and by a thirst for dramatic numbers. I worry that exaggerated reporting of hazards distorts our priorities and misdirects our efforts.
These comments are based on detailed analysis our firm has undertaken in the past year - results of which will be published shortly."

+

"when you write, "Relative sea level rise in this area has been about 32cm over the past 100 years," how much of that is actual sea rise and how much is land sinking? What is the actual rate for sea rise (not relative) in that area? Is there any reliable data?

Also, as the island is in a river mouth, how has man's influence on the river system itself affected things? Are there damns, reservoirs, hydroelectric plants upstream? In other words, is the outpouring of silt at the same levels as in past decades?

It's amazing that the Biloxi-Chitimacha-Choctaw tribes people on the Isle de Jean Charles, Louisiana are facing the same problems . . . amazing at first glance, until you investigate what has been going on upriver. There, it is not global warming but the loss of silt that is causing them to lose their land. But the history seems to be of indigenous communities being driven onto shifting islands that no one else wanted to live on (the colonists I mean).

More Indians in the americas seem to be losing their land through gas pipelines than CO2."

+

"about 1/2 is post-glacial rebound (the land mass is subsiding) and the other 1/2 is sea level rise. Lots of good work has been done on this by our federal government's Natural Resources agency (http://www.dfo-mpo.gc.ca/Library/353519.pdf).
The Island is situated within Malpeque Bay, an estuary of Prince Edward Island which is, itself, within the Gulf of St. Lawrence. Human activities have had minimal effects on surrounding flow conditions. As alluded to in an earlier reference to work by Shaw et al, the shaping of this landscape is predominantly due to the last glaciation and subsequent action of waves, tides and changing sea levels."





Prempal Singh 7 months ago
ActivityRank: 0
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