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Having recently joined the team as the RA for the Bristol part of the project and with the first full team meeting still a few weeks away, I got in touch with the two lead artists for the Bristol case study, Iain Biggs and Antony Lyons and suggested a meet and greet. Antony suggested the Mud Dock, a cafe and bike shop located on the pleasant harbour side of the River Avon and from whose terrace we could look out onto the water. And so, on a sunny afternoon we convened at this lovely spot for a chat. 

Being only half of the team, we were not set about making big decisions and so instead the conversation was free-flowing, following various thoughts and ideas, dwelling in whirlpools, and sometimes dissipating into the air. 

Among the things we discussed were the difficulties surrounding the selection of case studies in a place like Bristol. The hydrocitizenship project aims not only to draw upon existing communities, but also to participate in the building of communities around aspects of water in the city. 

 

We discussed the potential case study areas, and the extent to which the census and open atlas maps of Bristol gave a sense of different parts of Bristol - and also the extent to which they can sometimes fail in terms of evoking a sense of place and the difficulties of defining places based on statistical information. Iain pointed out the danger of assuming that areas in which there are a lot of immigrants or non-white people are in any sense more a community than other places, or in any sense homogenous. There is perhaps more to be discussed with relation to the various maps and information about the city and how these represent places, and how this might impact on case study selection. Certainly, how we define community and the assumptions that we make about this early on in the project are of paramount importance, as it will affect our interactions profoundly... 

Antony also spoke about and showed some examples from previous artistic projects of his that have involved thinking about some aspect of water, such as tides, and a communal laundry space as a site for community in a piece of work in Portugal... 

Conversation flowed and meandered like a river and we covered many things and thoughts about the project... thoughts to be continued... 


Having recently joined the team as the RA for the Bristol part of the project and with the first full team meeting still a few weeks away, I got in touch with the two lead artists for the Bristol case study, Iain Biggs and Antony Lyons and suggested a meet and greet. Antony suggested the Mud Dock, a cafe and bike shop located on the pleasant harbour side of the River Avon and from whose terrace we could look out onto the water. And so, on a sunny afternoon we convened at this lovely spot for a chat. 

Being only half of the team, we were not set about making big decisions and so instead the conversation was free-flowing, following various thoughts and ideas, dwelling in whirlpools, and sometimes dissipating into the air. 

Among the things we discussed were the difficulties surrounding the selection of case studies in a place like Bristol. The hydrocitizenship project aims not only to draw upon existing communities, but also to participate in the building of communities around aspects of water in the city. 

 

We discussed the potential case study areas, and the extent to which the census and open atlas maps of Bristol gave a sense of different parts of Bristol - and also the extent to which they can sometimes fail in terms of evoking a sense of place and the difficulties of defining places based on statistical information. Iain pointed out the danger of assuming that areas in which there are a lot of immigrants or non-white people are in any sense more a community than other places, or in any sense homogenous. There is perhaps more to be discussed with relation to the various maps and information about the city and how these represent places, and how this might impact on case study selection. Certainly, how we define community and the assumptions that we make about this early on in the project are of paramount importance, as it will affect our interactions profoundly... 

Antony also spoke about and showed some examples from previous artistic projects of his that have involved thinking about some aspect of water, such as tides, and a communal laundry space as a site for community in a piece of work in Portugal... 

Conversation flowed and meandered like a river and we covered many things and thoughts about the project... thoughts to be continued... 

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